Emergency procedures

A lot of time is spend on training emergency procedures – and for a good reason. Following emergency procedures prevents incidents developing to accidents with risk of fatalities to follow. Most pilots will at some point during their career experience incidents that potentially can develop if not dealt with correctly. Far the most accidents are small incidents that escalates because they are either not dealt with or because they are overseen by the pilot.

The main emergency procedures trained for during the practical flying are:

  • Engine fire on ground, en-route and during landing
  • Engine stop (power off) during take-off, en-route and during landing
  • Stalls in different configurations (e.g. configured for landing during a turn)
  • Recovering from abnormal flight positions

Today we went out to train some of these procedures, and in the video below, you will experience how the emergencies are simulated in a controlled environment. Some of the exercises really makes ones stomach tickling because of the G-force.

Many recovering procedures involves quite violent application to one or multiple flight controls. It can be quite challenging to overcome ones own comfort zone to execute some of the procedures – e.g. pointing the nose straight down towards the ground in low altitude after an engine failure during take-off. Another aspect is the fact that the aircraft sometimes performs a bit unreliable during these abnormal configurations – e.g. during stalls where loosing lift one wing before the other causes the aircraft to bank very suddenly.