Tag Archives: schoolflight

The long solo navigation flight

Finally the day came for the long solo navigation flight to Odense (EKOD) and Aarhus (EKAH). A total distance of 228 NM (422 km) and a total airborne time of 2h40m.

Route
Click
to see large map

It felt really good to fill the fuel tanks almost to the maximum knowing that I was going to burn almost all of it during this day (when not thinking of the cost of course).

The weather had been teasing me a bit, and originally the flight was planned for Wednesday but I had to postpone it to Friday because of bad weather. Even Friday there were a couple of weather concerns so I had actually made two flight plans; a safe one with minimum altitude to allow flying under low clouds and an optimal plan in case I was able to fly high. Fortunately the weather turned out fine. Near Vejle I did however pass some quite heavy comulus clouds with rain and turbulence, but the weather was moving slow, so on my way home I could go high in FL75 over the Kattegat sea home to Roskilde.

Flight plans:

For some reason I did not perform very well with the landings during this flight. Maybe because there was a thousand other things to think about. I discussed the landings with my instructor and I actually had extra training in cross wind landing and use of rudder. Not that I didn’t know how to do it, but to get the procedures into my bones.

Nevertheless this was a brilliant day – a great experience – that fulfilled all my expectations. I really hope and look forward to being able to fly cross country again when I am done with the school flights.

Enjoy the video. I hope you sense the great feeling of flying cross country.

Finally just a couple of pictures from the day:

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The long dual navigation flight

One of the best lessons in the entire lesson program is the long cross country dual navigation flight. The destinations are Billund Airport (EKBI) which is an international airport in mid Jutland. Second destination is Sønderborg (EKSB) which is a small airport that operates a view domestic routes and some general aviation. On the route from Billund to Sønderborg is the military air force base Skrydstrup which requires clearance for crossing of the airspace.

I grew up on a farm with my family not far from Billund and my parents still live there, so I planned a route going north of Billund to get a nice view of my home town before approaching Billund Airport.

Video from the flight with my instructor Ivan (in Danish):

The video starts where we are overflying my home town just north of Billund Airport. We did a 360 degree turn and started the approach to Billund Airport. Next we depart towards Sønderborg and get clearance to climb into the TMA (controlled airspace) because the air was quite turbulent in low altitude. Finally approaching Sønderborg in a quite strong cross wind – so because of my lack of cross wind training, my instructor had to help a bit with that one. The next day I actually went out and had 13 cross wind landings just to catch up on that one.

I had prepared the flight the day in advance and created 3 separate flight plans, and sent 3 separate ATS (ICAO) flight plans. As said the first one going a little bit north for a sightseeing at my home town, and the other two flights more or less direct.

Lang nav route
(Click on map to enlarge)

Flight plans:

During the flight there was time to focus on things that I really never had time to do during the short school flights previously – e.g. leaning the mixture correctly and play with the GPS. Also this was my first flight climbing to flight levels – more precisely FL65 on our way crossing Storebælt from Zealand to Fyn and Jutland.

One of my friends is working as a pilot for Primera Air in Billund Airport flying the Boeing 737, and unfortunately he was flying at the time I would land in Billund, but I got another surprise when I called the tower for the initial taxi clearance in Roskilde; “Cleared for taxi to run-up runway 11 via A and B, information X 1027 is correct, and then I have a greeting from Nikolas from Primera Air wishing you a nice flight.” So my friend obviously called the tower is Roskilde when passing during the morning on his way to Copenhagen in his B737.

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A brilliant day with a lot of things to learn and a lot of great impressions.

Short and soft field landings

A cold front had passed during the night with thunderstorms and heavy rain. Next morning on the backside of the front, the weather turned out beautifully. On the board for this school flight was short field landing on soft ground, so perfect conditions at Ringsted airfield (EKRS). After landing and take-off we returned to Roskilde Airport (EKRK).

Grass runways can be quite unreliable when wet. They can be soft and slippery. During landing it can be difficult to break the aircraft, so it is important to land the aircraft right at the treshold to have as much runway available for stopping.

When taking off it is advised to perform a rolling start (without stop on the runway) to avoid getting stuck in the soft ground. The aircraft is pulled in the air very early (so early that the stall horn will sound). The aircraft is kept in the ground effect (just a couple of feets over ground) to build up airspeed before starting the climb.

All in all a fun exercise and for the first time I was rather pleased with this (third) landing in Ringsted, so things are improving.

Emergency procedures

A lot of time is spend on training emergency procedures – and for a good reason. Following emergency procedures prevents incidents developing to accidents with risk of fatalities to follow. Most pilots will at some point during their career experience incidents that potentially can develop if not dealt with correctly. Far the most accidents are small incidents that escalates because they are either not dealt with or because they are overseen by the pilot.

The main emergency procedures trained for during the practical flying are:

  • Engine fire on ground, en-route and during landing
  • Engine stop (power off) during take-off, en-route and during landing
  • Stalls in different configurations (e.g. configured for landing during a turn)
  • Recovering from abnormal flight positions

Today we went out to train some of these procedures, and in the video below, you will experience how the emergencies are simulated in a controlled environment. Some of the exercises really makes ones stomach tickling because of the G-force.

Many recovering procedures involves quite violent application to one or multiple flight controls. It can be quite challenging to overcome ones own comfort zone to execute some of the procedures – e.g. pointing the nose straight down towards the ground in low altitude after an engine failure during take-off. Another aspect is the fact that the aircraft sometimes performs a bit unreliable during these abnormal configurations – e.g. during stalls where loosing lift one wing before the other causes the aircraft to bank very suddenly.